The most surreal places to visit

Gilbert Travis on Apr 06

The Wave is located in the Coyote Buttes North area of the Arizona Strip. There are two great photographic locations in Coyote Buttes North (The Wave and The Second Wave) and numerous minor ones including Top Rock Arch, Melody Arch and the Grotto, the Hooters, The Alcove, Sand Cove, and Fatali's Boneyard. The Wave is best photographed midday so as to minimize the extensive shadows, the other areas listed above are best photographed mid-late afternoon.

Fly Geyser, also known as Fly Ranch Geyser or the Green Geyser is a man-made small geothermal geyser located in Washoe County, Nevada approximately 20 miles (32 km) north of Gerlach. Fly Geyser is located near the edge of Fly Reservoir and is only about 5 feet (1.5 m) high, but 12 feet (3.7 m) wide, counting the mound on which it sits.

Antelope Canyon is a slot canyon in the American Southwest. It is located on Navajo land east of Page, Arizona. Antelope Canyon includes two separate, photogenic slot canyon sections, referred to individually as Upper Antelope Canyon (The Crack) and Lower Antelope Canyon (The Corkscrew)

Hamilton Pool Preserve is a natural pool that was created when the dome of an underground river collapsed due to massive erosion thousands of years ago. The pool is located about 23 miles (37 km) west of Austin, Texas off Highway 71. Since the 1960s, Hamilton Pool has been a popular summer swimming spot for Austin visitors and residents.

Moraine Lake is a glacially-fed lake in Banff National Park outside the Village of Lake Louise, Alberta, Canada. It is situated in the Valley of the Ten Peaks.

The lake, being glacially fed, does not reach its crest until mid to late June. When it is full, it reflects a distinct shade of blue. The colour is due to the refraction of light off the rock flour deposited in the lake on a continual basis.

A naturally occurring rock archway, on the Spurwink Island Path of the East Coast Trail.

The Capilano Suspension Bridge is a simple suspension bridge crossing the Capilano River in the District of North Vancouver.

Located in the Marieta Islands, about 20 nautical miles from Puerto Vallarta, lies an idyllic beach paradise hidden underneath a hole in the ground. Called the “Hidden Beach” or “Playa del Amor” (Beach of Love), this one-of-a-kind natural wonder has remained untouched by human hands for many years. Within its natural cavernous shell, crystal-clear turquoise waters peacefully lap against its powdery white shores, out of sight and out of reach from the rest of the world. Only recently when its photos spread virally across the internet did it become one of the most popular beaches in Mexico.

This waterfall consists of many cataracts following one after another as can be seen in the first photo in the picture gallery, taken from near the top of the sequence of cascades. The larger cataracts may be as high as 6 meters (20 feet) or so. The one pictured to the right is next to the bottom of the sequence.

The water is as blue as it looks in the pictures, and has a high mineral content. Where it falls on rocks or fallen trees it encases them in a thick shell-like coating of limestone. This can be seen clearly in one of the minor falls in one of the pictures in the gallery below, where the part of a tree that leans against the waterfall is heavily coated while the part further away is not coated. Some fully coated log shapes can also be seen inside the fall in that same picture, as well as coating on the rocks.

During much of the distance the water descends in two streams, with small islands in the middle.

"Deep beneath Mexico’s Yucatan Peninsula is a dive site like no other. Surrounded by fallen leaves and dead tree branches in what seems like a deep-sea mystical forest runs a surreal underground river 100 feet below the surface.

The strange natural phenomenon is said to be made possible by a a thin layer of hydrogen sulfate that causes the freshwater above to separate from the saltwater below. The saltwater, which is more dense than the freshwater, can flow independently on the ocean floor, assuming an eerie cloud-like appearance."

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